Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Uniquely Updikean
Take on Nostalgia

'What is nostalgia but love for that part of ourselves which is in heaven, forever removed from change and corruption?'
--the late John Updike, whom we would like to think now resides in writerly heaven. We recently noted his passing here.

10 Comments:

At 9:42 PM, Anonymous stan said...

wow

 
At 9:43 PM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

It hit you, huh? Me too.

 
At 10:01 PM, Anonymous Donna said...

What a great quote. Wishing I could be completely nostalgic and find Heaven on earth. Don't we all?

 
At 11:50 PM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

Please let us know when you find it.

 
At 10:19 AM, Blogger Kim said...

Heaven on earth is a state of complete peace. It's achievable, if we find the power to let go.

Now to just figure out how to let go.

Richard Bach wrote: You are always free to change your mind and choose a different future, or a different past.

I think that is what nostalgia is, choosing a different past. If we can choose a different today, then we've found the elusive Heaven on Earth.

 
At 10:22 AM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

It all depends on what you choose to focus on, doesn't it? And I like that notion of choosing a different past, which of course is also about choosing what to focus on from the past.

 
At 10:35 AM, Blogger Jim Murdoch said...

I'm not so romantic:

Nostalgia — sounds like an ailment, a sickness of the soul perhaps. - Living with the Truth

 
At 10:41 AM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

Oh my. That seems pretty harsh.

 
At 5:49 PM, Blogger Maria said...

Tennyson in "Tears, Idle Tears" hits the right note for me on "the days that are no more." I am also fond of Updike's short story "A&P," which many students like. I heard Updike read at JCU in the mid-1970s. That was an experience--I remember his relaxed yet assured presence. I later learned that he was in significant pain and had an emergency appendectomy at University Hospitals several hours after the reading.

 
At 6:30 PM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

That's quite a story. I never knew Updike made an appearance at John Carroll. That makes quite an imposing trinity of three major figures to make an appearance there in the mid-70s: Updike, Springsteen and Mother Theresa.

 

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