Sunday, August 17, 2008

Best Lead of the Month

'I am a New Age skeptic. I used to be a New Age cynic, so this change shows how far I have come in opening my mind to things I do not understand. I no longer dismiss channeling and crystals and acupuncture as so much hocus-pocus, nor do I embrace these practices. I simply await proof.'
--from this piece on how physical space and emotions intersect, in the always-interesting Scientific American. You can review earlier best leads here

6 Comments:

At 12:01 PM, Anonymous chris said...

Personally, I found the link to the article on kissing far more interesting. But maybe that is reflected in the feng shui(or lack thereof) of my home.

 
At 12:07 PM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

Hey, we'll take that. Actually, my hope is always in these situations that readers will not only follow the link to the individual story I mention, but take a hint that the entire pub might bear looking into also. Glad to see you've done that. Scientific American isn't the best known magazine in the world to generalists, but there's always much worth reading in it. And the web makes it so much more accessible to so many people than the print version.

 
At 1:32 AM, Anonymous chris said...

It's one of my favorites, and get a look at my son's subscription to it if he ever happens to leave it out. For a moment I almost thought I wish he wasn't so organized, but then had an attack of sanity and thought, "WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?!!!" and was just happy for the link. Maybe I'll try to check it out online more often.

 
At 10:23 AM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

We're down with that, Chris. Is this your first time commenting? I can't seem to recall a Chris ever showing up before in our comments. In either case, welcome, and do come back.

 
At 2:49 PM, Blogger Michelle O'Neil said...

When I'm in a home that's been organized with the principles of Feng Shui, there is a difference, a good difference. I think the decluttering that FS requires is a large part of it.

 
At 2:58 PM, Blogger John Ettorre said...

Well said, Michelle. But I think most writers--by their very nature as well as the nature of their work--tend to have serious problems with decluttering. I know I do (just ask my family about my car, otherwise known as the mobile filing cabinet). We acquire mountains of paper and other paraphernalia as background that we're sure will come in handy when we next write about that topic. Of course, digital tools open the possibility of reducing that hard-copy clutter into a far more manageable and orderly digital version. But people of a certain age who have been doing things one way in their profession for decades are less likely to make wholesale changes without serious reasons to do so. That happened when the entire world went to computers and email, and those left behind with typewriters were rendered nearly obsolete as economic players. I'm not sure manically cluttered offices provide quite the same spur to change. But thanks as always for your thoughtful comment.

 

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